Appendicectomy

This page contains recent news articles, when available, and an overview of Appendicectomy but does not offer medical advice. You should contact your physician with regard to any health issues or concerns.

News: Appendicectomy

[an error occurred while processing this directive] [an error occurred while processing this directive] [an error occurred while processing this directive] [an error occurred while processing this directive] [an error occurred while processing this directive] [an error occurred while processing this directive] [an error occurred while processing this directive]

Background information on Appendicectomy [When available]

An appendicectomy (or appendectomy) is the surgical removal of the vermiform appendix. This procedure is normally performed as an emergency procedure when the patient is suffering from acute appendicitis. In the absence of surgical facilities, intravenous antibiotics are used to delay or avoid the onset of sepsis; it is now recognised that many cases will resolve when treated conservatively. In some cases the appendicitis resolves completely; more often, an inflammatory mass forms around the appendix. This is a relative contraindication to surgery.

Appendicectomy may be performed laparoscopically or as an open operation. Laparoscopy is often used if the diagnosis is in doubt, or if it is desirable to hide the scars in the umbilicus or in the pubic hair line. Recovery may be a little quicker with laparoscopic surgery; the procedure is more expensive and resource-intensive than open surgery and generally takes a little longer, with the (low in most patients) additional risks associated with pneumoperitoneum (inflating the abdomen with gas). Advanced pelvic sepsis occasionally requires a lower midline laparotomy.

In general terms, the procedure for an open appendicectomy is as follows.

Antibiotics are given immediately if there are signs of sepsis, otherwise a single dose of prophylactic intravenous antibiotics is given immediately prior to surgery.

General anaesthesia is induced, with endotracheal intubation and full muscle relaxation, and the patient is positioned supine.

The abdomen is prepared and draped and is examined under anaesthesia. If a mass is present, the incision is made over the mass; otherwise, the incision is made over McBurney's point, one third of the way from the anterior superior iliac spine (ASIS) and the umbilicus; this represents the position of the base of the appendix (the position of the tip is variable).

From Wikipedia

Background information on

Search the web for more resources on Appendicectomy



Health Home | Conditions | Cancer | Medications | Surgery | Vaccines


The Cancer News Network


Disclaimer:

Contact a physician with regard to health concerns. Email requests for further health information will be discarded.

The materials contained on this Web site are for informational purposes only and do not constitute health or medical advice. Use of information on this site does not create or constitute any kind of agreement or contract between you and the owners or users of this site, the owners of the servers upon which it is housed, or anyone else who is in any way connected with this site.

Many links on cancernewsnetwork.org lead to other sites. cancernewsnetwork.org does not sponsor, endorse or otherwise approve of the materials appearing in such sites. Nor is CancerNewsNetwork.org responsible for dead or misdirected links.

IF YOU NEED A LINK OR TEXT REMOVED FROM THIS PAGE PLEASE CONTACT cancernewsnetwork (at) live.com.
We will do our best to accommodate your request.



COPYRIGHT 2009 CANCERNEWSNETWORK | Privacy | Privacy